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KSTR Fundraiser was a Great Success

We would like to take this time to formally thank all of you who helped Kids Saving the Rainforest raise money for our Wildlife Rescue Center. The event was amazing and we are very grateful to say that we raised more than $4,500!  This will help us to sustain our efforts at the center for a limited period of time and ensure continued maintenance to rescue, rehabilitate and release wildlife in our zone! 

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KSTR Sustainability Project

Chicks and Rachel

Chicks and Rachel

By Volunteer Rachel Melvin 

Kids Saving the Rainforest is focused on preserving and protecting the local wildlife.  This mission includes housing a wildlife sanctuary on the grounds of the Blue Banyan Inn on the property that is called “the finca”. The sanctuary currently houses 29 monkeys plus a crab eating raccoon. Feeding them, as well as the volunteers that care for them, and BBI’s numerous guests can take an extraordinary amount of food.

KSTR strives to implement a more sustainable operation on the Finca and our next venture in this arena is creating a sustainable egg supply to feed monkeys, volunteers, and guests.

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Monkey Bridges: Where They Are and How They Function

monkey bridge, mother followed by baby

Mother being followed by a baby on a Monkey Bridge

By Jenny Thelan, Volunteer and Pre-Vet Student at Iowa State

 Have you ever seen the blue ropes hanging around Manuel Antonio and Quepos? Those aren’t just any ropes, those are known as monkey bridges, and they’re very important for the conservation for all the monkeys in the area. The monkey bridges hanging way up in the trees over the road help provide safe paths for monkeys (and other animals) to travel safely over the roads. This helps prevent numerous vehicle accidents where monkeys are hit by cars, and also helps prevent the monkeys from using electrical wires and getting electrocuted. 

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Stop the Fireworks in Manuel Antonio. Respect the Wildlife and Environment!

By Jennifer Rice

We are thrilled that hotel owners and wedding planners unanimously agreed to stop setting off fireworks in Manuel Antonio due to their negative impact on the wildlife and environment here! 

Fireworks create a very serious problem and a very dangerous one for the rainforest. We have found that most people do not want to cause harm to the wildlife of our area, that is part of the reason they are visiting or living here. But ignorance (which means “lack of knowledge, education and unawareness of something, often of something important”) is the main culprit. So by  writing this article, people will now know the effects of fireworks on the wildlife and the environment, and will understand the seriousness of it. 

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Strategic Planning and Organization 2012-2013

By Sabine Seifert

I learned about KSTR last year when I first spoke with Pía, the KSTR Wildlife Vet. We were talking about my Educational Program in “Project Management” and how it is a way to improve the efficiency in a business project.  KSTR was interested in learning about it and I was interested in putting it to work. KSTR consists of dedicated people with a keen sense of the environment and filled with fantastic ideas. To implement these ideas formally we began with the project “Kids Saving the Rainforest Strategic Planning and Organization for 2012/2013”. This plan serves as a structured framework in organizational developmental processes. The team consists of Costa Rican, American and German members.

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Kids Saving The Rainforest – March Update

This month KSTR has been working hard on a strategic plan to move us forward.  We have all the projects: Wildlife Rescue Center, Monkey Bridges, Wildlife Sanctuary, Reforestation, Organic Gardens for the wildlife we care for, and a new Volunteer Center and Program to educate students, biologists, vets, teachers about the rainforest and how they can help to save it.

We are very proud of our efforts to save the rainforest, but we have run into a little problem of not being able to fund them!
So we have a new Fundraising Director, Scott Braman, who is a graduate of Dartmouth College and a Fulbright Scholar who lived and worked with remote tribes in Ecuador’s Amazon. Scott is currently making important documentaries in LA, check out his website to see his work: http://www.scottcbraman.com/

Welcome aboard Scott!

With Scott’s help we have come up with several ways to raise donations and wanted to share them with you!

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Kids Saving The Rainforest – February Update

KSTR has been expanding rapidly and we are excited to share it with you!  We have just completed a new volunteer center at our Wildlife Sanctuary with bunkrooms and deluxe rooms.  We have a great program set up for all types of volunteers; long term, short term, and Zoo Keeper experiences.  We are accepting student groups from Universities, High Schools and Middle Schools, from around the world.  We have university groups from Costa Rica as well and are expanding to include high schools on International field trips.

If you would like more information, please contact Pablo, our Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@kidssavingtherainforest.org

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Self Sufficient Living

By Vernita Gundy 

Self Sufficient Living… HMMMMMM…What is that? I am a US citizen who lives in the City of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania and although I’ve heard of self-sufficient living, I have never learned what it actually meant until now. Self-sufficient living means self reliance in learning to grow your own, make your own, sell your own and bake your own, for homesteading, urban homesteading or mini farms. 

 I’ve been in Costa Rica volunteering for Kids Saving the Rainforest the last 3 months and I have slowly started to understand what it is all about and how important it is to change our way of living so we can all be on this earth for years to come. 

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Nina, the Spider Monkey’s Story

By Volunteer Christine Ellenburg 

Some animals are happy to be pets, like cats, dogs and fish. Other animals want to live in the wild, like monkeys. My name is Nina and I’m a spider monkey. I started off happily in the wild. 

Life was great I would wake up in the morning to the “hooo doottt hooo doottt” of the Motmots. I would go for breakfast with my brother Manny or a swing with my sister Stella until one day I woke up to a different sound… 

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What do Carbon Footprint and Carbon Neutral mean?

There’s a whole new world of terms out there that may be confusing to you, such as Carbon Footprint and Carbon Neutral.  We are going to explain them and hopefully teach you to reduce your carbon footprint! 

So, just what does Carbon Footprint mean?  Carbon footprint is the amount of carbon dioxide given out through the use of fossil fuels by a person on a daily basis.

Do you want to know how much carbon do you emit?  There are lots of websites on the internet to calculate your footprint, but the one listed below is one that seems to work easily. www.zerofootprintoffsets.com   (Please note that you have to say that you live in the US or Canada to get your calculations).

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Marcel, the White Faced Monkey

Written by Melissa Ellenburg, Volunteer

This is one of 3 children’s stories written by the 16 year old Ellenburg Triplets.  Their 3 stories will become a a book to be sold by KSTR to teach children the importance of saving the rainforest.  It will be available next year.  

There once was a monkey named Marcel. He lived in a beautiful rainforest filled with perky parrots and colorful flowers. Marcel was very happy here. He swung in the trees and ate fruit and bugs all day long. 

One, day big monsters made out of metal came to the rainforest and started cutting trees down. They made loud roars and scared Marcel and all his friends and family. The people driving the machines said, “We need these trees to make paper and all kinds of things.” 

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The Family Who Fed the Monkeys

A short story By Volunteer Kevin Ellenburg

The Petersons were very excited. They were going to Costa Rica! They had heard lots of fantastic things about the country, and they couldn’t wait to see the monkeys. “I wonder if they like bananas”, said Tommy, the youngest of the Petersons. “Of course they do” said Mr. Peterson. “ALL monkeys love bananas”.
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KSTR’s New Volunteer Coordinator

Pablo Porras-Peñaranda

Pablo Porras-Peñaranda

By Julia Paltseva

Kids Saving the Rainforest is proud to present the newest member of its permanent staff – Pablo Porras-Peñaranda. Pablo, a biologist by training, will now serve as the Volunteer Coordinator. KSTR is a local non-profit organization based in Manuel Antonio whose goal is to preserve and educate about the rainforest and its many animals. As the organization’s popularity and mission has grown, the number of interested volunteers has increased.
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How It All Began

Janine & Aislin

Janine & Aislin, 9 years old

We are very proud of KSTR’s co-founders, Janine Licare and Aislin Livingstone.  They have both just graduated from two very prestigious colleges, Janine from Stanford in California and Aislin from McGill in Montreal.  Congratulations to you both!  Janine starts right away with a two-year program, Teach For America, teaching elementary school children (with English as a second language) in East Los Angeles.  Janine will concurrently be getting a Master’s Degree in Education at Loyola Marymount University.  We are thrilled that she will be able to teach these kids about the rainforest, it’s destruction, and then empower them to save it!
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Raising and Preparing a Kinkajou for a Life in the Wild.

By Pia Martin DVM KSTR Wildlife Vet

Kinkajous (Potos flavus) and in Spanish “Martillas”, are medium size mammals (40-55cms long, weighing 2-3kg), brownish colored from the Procyonid family. This means they are nocturnal, live in pairs or by themselves and are arboreal and terrestrial; just like raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coatis (Nasua narica). However, they have unique characteristics that make them very special in the rainforest. For example: although they are categorized as carnivores, they do not eat meat. Their diet is basically fruits, flowers, and rarely they will eat a bird’s egg or an insect. They have a 5 inch tongue that helps them get nectar from flowers making them pollinators. Their ankles and wrists can rotate more than most mammals helping them climb up and down trees and walk in branches easily. They also have a long prehensile tail that can wrap itself around a branch and hold on to most of the animal’s weight so it can hang and reach for a fruit in a lower branch.

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