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A CLOSE CALL FOR PRINCE ERIC!

slothBandaged sloth with 2 doctorsPrince Eric is a young adult male three-fingered sloth that came into our care at the beginning of August. We received a call from a local business that a sloth had fallen onto a bridge in the forest that surrounds their property. Sloths are actually very good at falling because of their sturdy skeleton (and they fall pretty regularly in a normal lifetime) but because the bridge that he fell onto wasn’t the soft forest floor he broke his arm.

X-rays determined that he would need orthopedic surgery to correct his fracture. Surgeons Dr Daniel Chavarría and Dr. Janet Sandi Carmiol have given Prince Eric a hopeful prognosis, despite the fact that three-fingered sloths don’t always do well with pins in their
bones. (Sloths tend to have allergic reactions to the metal, and therefore need longer healing time compared to similarly sized mammals.)

Prince Eric has been a sweet patient. TSI and his doctors are hoping for full recovery, but we need your support!

The Sloth InstituteRead updates on all of the sloths in care at TSI at TheSlothInstitute.org.


Welcome Popcorn and Simba!

The Sloth InstituteWe have two new sloths we rescued receiving medical care and rehabilitation at The Sloth Institute. Welcome Popcorn and Simba!

Popcorn is a juvenile female two-fingered sloth that fell out of a tree because she was sick and weak due to a bad mange infection. After a few months of treatment at TSI, she is feeling much better. She just needs to gain some more weight and then she’ll be ready to be released back to the wild.

Simba is a juvenile male three-fingered sloth who we found on the ground at a nearby hotel in poor health. We discovered he had a bacterial infection and parasites. He has been recovering smoothly and responding well to his treatments. We anticipate he will also be ready to go back to the wild as soon as he puts on a little more weight.

Read updates on all of the sloths in care at TSI at TheSlothInstitute.org.

popcorn and simba


Sloth Rescue Training With ICE

The Sloth InstituteInstituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE), Costa Rica’s government-run electricity and telecommunications services provider, often gets calls or is the first responder when people report a sloth in danger. Because ICE workers aren’t wildlife handlers, The Sloth Institute provides training to teach them how to properly handle the sloths for the workers’ safety and for the safety of the sloths.

Toy sloth in an ICE truckWe also discuss TSI’s research and rehabilitation and release program, educate about general sloth facts and give hands-on training on how to safely remove sloths from wires. It’s not as easy it may look! The education instills the workers with confidence in their abilities to handle and help sloths.

What To Do If You See A Sloth In Danger

If you see a sloth who is in need of help, please call or send a message via WhatsApp to The Sloth Institute’s Sloth Response Team at +506 87SLOTHS. Ideally it is best to send photos or a video of the sloth in need of rescue. The TSI Sloth Response Team can then properly assess the situation. There are times we get a call about a sloth in danger when they aren’t in need of rescue.

You can also call your local Bomberos (Fire Department). If a sloth is on the electric wires you can also call ICE.

ABOUT THE SLOTH INSTITUTE

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please visit TheSlothInstitute.org or email us: info@theslothinstitute.org. If you see a sloth who needs help: CALL or WHATSAPP +506 87SLOTHS 7 5 6 8 4 7.


Update on Dolly

The Sloth InstituteRemember Dolly the two-fingered sloth? She was receiving experimental acupuncture treatment for an injury due to an electrocution from a power line. Her treatments were donated by Dr. Constant Boshoff, BSc D.C. of Rafiki Chiropractic Care. He hoped that several weeks of acupuncture could help Dolly regain mobility in her right arm. Treatments began in February and completed at the end of May.

Dolly practicing climbingWhat was the result?

Dolly’s experimental acupuncture treatment WORKED! Dolly is now able to use her arm and hand to climb. This accomplishment gives assurance of her ability to survive in the wild.

“I’ll take her swimming and see if we can continue to improve her mobility to get her arm to recover 100%,” said TSI Sloth Director Sam Trull.

The Sloth Institute is grateful to Dr. Constant Boshoff for his generous support. Dolly’s successful treatment with acupuncture means hope for other sloths in need.

Watch a video of Dolly after her successful acupuncture treatment! Check out “Sloth Diaries” on TheSlothInstitute.org or find us on Facebook and Instagram @TheSlothInstitute.

ABOUT THE SLOTH INSTITUTE

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please visit TheSlothInstitute.org or email us: info@theslothinstitute.org. If you see a sloth who needs help: CALL or WHATSAPP +506 87SLOTHS 7 5 6 8 4 7.


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Finding Freedom: A New Comic Series About Sloth Education and Conservation

The Sloth Institute

“Finding Freedom” is a brand new sloth conservation comic series based on true stories from The Sloth Institute. The story stars a young Sam Trull, TSI’s Co-Founder & Sloth Director, doodled by illustrator Vivian Nguyen. Click to enlarge.

Finding freedom comic strip

Click to enlarge.

Follow the continuing story of “Finding Freedom” on Instagram @findingfreedom_aslothstory

ABOUT THE SLOTH INSTITUTE

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please visit TheSlothInstitute.org or email us: info@theslothinstitute.org. If you see a sloth who needs help: CALL or WHATSAPP +506 87SLOTHS 7 5 6 8 4 7.


TSI HOPES ACUPUNCTURE CAN HELP AN INJURED SLOTH NAMED DOLLY

The Sloth InstituteAn electrocuted 2-fingered sloth rescued by The Sloth Institute undergoes experimental acupuncture treatment, thanks to Rafiki Chiropractic Care. For humans and some domestic animals, acupuncture has commonly been used to treat a variety of health issues, from physical disabilities to neurological issues. In the special case of Dolly, an adult female 2-fingered sloth, an electrocution from a power line left her severely injured. Her left eye was damaged and her right arm had lost some of its mobility. The Sloth Institute came to the rescue and gave her immediate critical care.

Dolly receiving acupunctureFortunately, her eye healed and regained full functionality. But Dolly showed signs that she had lost some motor skills in her right arm. Acupuncture has successfully treated humans, dogs and cats. Could this treatment help sloths? Dr. Constant Boshoff, BSc D.C., who practices at Rafiki Chiropractic Care in Manuel Antonio, is willing to find out. He has generously donated several treatment sessions of acupuncture with electrical stimulation, which, according to Dr. Boshoff, “reinforces the acupuncture stimulation. We will see how she responds after six weeks.” Dr. Boshoff loves animals. “The little I can do is only a pleasure,” he added.

Follow Dolly’s story! Visit TheSlothInstitute.org or facebook.com/TheSlothInstitute and check out “Sloth Diaries.”

ABOUT THE SLOTH INSTITUTE

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please visit TheSlothInstitute.org or email us: info@theslothinstitute.org. If you see a sloth who needs help: CALL or WHATSAPP +506 87SLOTHS 7 5 6 8 4 7.


SLOTH SPEEDWAYS ARE SAVING LIVES and you can help to create more!

The Sloth Institute
Sloth crossing the roadDeforestation in the rainforest is causing sloths to lose vital connections to their homes, food, and safety. When trees are cut down, sloths try to find other ways to travel—they climb on to electrical wires or they try to cross the road. They end up being killed or badly maimed. The Sloth Institute has treated sloths who survived, but some have lost eyes and limbs after being electrocuted or hit by cars.

SLOTH SPEEDWAYS are rope bridges that sloths and other wildlife utilize to travel throughout the rainforest. Today, they have become more important than ever. SLOTH SPEEDWAYS reconnect the
rainforest so that sloths and all wildlife can continue to access their known resources to food and safety. The animals need many more SLOTH SPEEDWAYS, and we need your help.

Sloth on rope bridgeABOUT THE SLOTH INSTITUTE

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please visit TheSlothInstitute.org or email us: info@theslothinstitute.org.

Dolly was rescued after being electrocuted. Luckily, TSI was able to save her injured eye.

Dolly was rescued after being electrocuted. Luckily, TSI was able to save her injured eye.

If you see a sloth who needs help: CALL or WHATSAPP +506 87SLOTHS (756847)


The Sloth Institute in Costa Rica is leading the world in sloth research conservation

The Sloth InstituteThe Sloth Institute (TSI), based in Manuel Antonio, is leading the rest of the world in efforts to research the behavioral ecology of wild, rehabilitating and released sloths after rehabilitating two three-fingered sloths called Destiny and Pocahontas—two of the few three-fingered sloths in Costa Rica to be successfully rehabilitated from a very young age and returned into the wild.

TSI, which is a not-for-profit organization, aims to research captive, wild and recently released sloths, so that scientists and animal-lovers all over the world might better understand the internet’s favorite slowpokes, as well as ensuring the conservation of sloths and providing care for injured sloths so they can be released.
Read More…


You Don’t Have To Be an Expert to Be a Sloth Warrior

The Sloth Instituteby Sam Trull, Co-Founder and Sloth Director of The Sloth Institute

Abusing sloths for selfie tourism is one of the conservation issues that The Sloth Institute (TSI) is very passionate about correcting, but it is one that we often thought would never happen in our “backyard”. Most of the online evidence (photos and videos) of sloths being abused for hugs and photos from tourists originates in other countries, countries that are more ‘well known’ for their wildlife trafficking. But the truth is that these kinds of wildlife crimes DO happen in Costa Rica, even if they are better disguised.

Someone may tell you they “rescued” this sloth but now it’s so used to humans that it cannot be released back into the wild. This is a lie. Someone may tell you that the sloth is happy you are giving it a hug, because look…it is smiling! This is a lie. Someone may tell you that wild sloths don’t mind living in captivity because they are lazy anyways and don’t move much. This is a lie. The people who commit these crimes are getting savvy. They know their audience is trying to pay attention, but even a caring tourist can get fooled.

The bottom line: Never participate in tourism that encourages you to pet, feed or take photos with wildlife (especially sloths).

Esperanza

Esperanza

Esperanza is a young juvenile three-fingered sloth that was rescued here in Costa Rica by the government from this selfish tourism scheme. After a thorough health check by myself and our vet friends at Toucan Rescue Ranch, we released her into the jungle.

Luckily, she is now wild and free and being tracked daily by our expert TSI sloth trackers. Since being set free into the jungle where she belongs, she has gained 1 kilogram (nearly doubling her original weight) in just 6 months. This is a testament to sloths being healthier and happier in the wild with the freedom to make their own choices about their own lives. We can stop this industry together.

Don’t Be Selfi(e)sh … #SayNOtoSlothSelfies

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please email info@theslothinstitute.org.

If you see a sloth who needs help: ALL or WHATSAPP +506 87756847/87SLOTHS.


The Sloth Institute – September/October 2018

Sloth Institute header

Sad Face icon1. Depression

Wild sloths held in captivity become stressed and unhappy.

Leaf icon2. Destruction of Forests

Forests need sloths to be healthy and balanced.

Medical icon3. Diseases

Sloths may host different parasites, viruses, and infections that can pass to humans with one touch!

Graph icon4. Depletion

The wild sloth population suffers with each sloth taken from the wild.

X icon5. Death

Many captive sloths die due to the stress of transport and an improper diet.

Don’t Be Selfi(e)sh … #SayNOtoSlothSelfies

The Sloth InstituteThe Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please email info@theslothinstitute.org.

If you see a sloth who needs help: ALL or WHATSAPP +506 87756847/87SLOTHS.


Meet Merlin: More Than a Pretty Face

Merlin the slothMerlin is a wild sloth that we have been tracking since February. Through the use of binoculars, we recently discovered that he had acquired a serious fungal infection. However, our team is actively treating him with special baths! He will lose a lot of hair in the process, but we know that with these treatments, he’s feeling a lot better already.

ADOPT MERLIN through TSI’s symbolic adoption program Adopt A Sloth on TheSlothInstituteCostaRica.org.

The Sloth InstituteFollow Merlin’s story on Facebook & Instagram @TheSlothInstitute #SlothDiaries.

The Sloth Institute (TSI)’s mission is to enhance the welfare and conservation of sloths through research and education. TSI is located in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. For more information please email info@theslothinstitute.org.

If you see a sloth who needs help: ALL or WHATSAPP +506 87756847/87SLOTHS.


Leave No Trace For Wildlife This Season

The Sloth InstituteBy Deanna Fisher, TSI Marketing Director

It’s no wonder why folks from around the world are rushing to Costa Rica for their vacation destination. With sprawling coastlines, lush rainforests, and many natural waterfalls, Manuel Antonio offers a unique slice of heaven for every vacation goer. The chance to observe wildlife around every corner provides a fantastic experience many seek while in the area. With these opportunities however come the responsibility to treat wildlife with the respect they deserve and need. Here are 5 ways you can leave no trace during your time in Costa Rica:

sloth1. USE LESS PLASTIC

Single use plastics are a growing problem world-wide. It is estimated that by 2030 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. Do your part to use less by utilizing reusable shopping bags and/or refilling water bottles when out and about. Avoid using straws in beverages and be sure to throw them away in proper receptacles not leave them on the beach or alongside trails.

2. KEEP WILDLIFE WILD

Do not touch, get close to, or pick up wild
animals for a “better look”. It is stressful to the animal and is possible that the animal may
harbor diseases. Additionally, we can transmit bacteria that is harmful to them. Sick or wounded animals can bite, peck or scratch, sending you to the hospital. Instead, observe wildlife from a distance so they are not scared or forced to flee.

Read More…


Meet The Sloth Institute Costa Rica

The Sloth InstituteBy Deanna Fisher, TSI Marketing Director

You may have noticed the Sloth Mobile or members of Team Sloth around Manuel Antonio and wondered more of our purpose. Founded in 2014, The Sloth Institute Costa Rica (TSI) strives to expand scientific knowledge and education about the charismatic sloth species found in Costa Rica. The goal: to enhance sloths well-being and assure their conservation around the globe.

Rihanna the slothUtilizing the skills and passion of Team Sloth members has provided TSI the opportunity to expand our goals and vision with other like-minded institutions dedicated to preserving sloth’s place in the wild.

TSI’s ongoing dedication to research, specializing in the behavior, health and welfare of recently released, wild and captive sloths, has allowed for increased understanding of proper care and conservation needs of the species. With this new knowledge and successful reintroductions via Saving Sloths Together with Toucan Rescue Ranch, TSI continues to work to shift previous belief that hand-raised and captive sloths could not flourish in the wild. With every new release, we are confident in our belief that together, we can save sloths.

Read More…


 Leave No Trace For Wildlife This Season

The Sloth InstituteBy Deanna Fisher, TSI Marketing Director

It’s no wonder why folks from around the world are rushing to Costa Rica for their vacation destination. With sprawling coastlines, lush rainforests, and many natural waterfalls, Manuel Antonio offers a unique slice of heaven for every vacation goer. The chance to observe wildlife around every corner provides a fantastic experience many seek while in the area. With these opportunities however come the responsibility to treat wildlife with the respect they deserve and need.

Here are 5 ways you can leave no trace during your time in Costa Rica:

1. USE LESS PLASTIC

Single use plastics are a growing problem worldwide. It is estimated that by 2030 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. Do your part to use less by utilizing reusable shopping bags and/or refilling water bottles when out and about. Avoid using straws in beverages and be sure to throw them away in proper receptacles not leave them on the beach or alongside trails.

2. KEEP WILDLIFE WILD

Do not touch, get close to, or pick up wild animals for a “better look”.

It is stressful to the animal and is possible that the animal may harbor diseases. Additionally, we can transmit bacteria that is harmful to them. Sick or wounded animals can bite, peck or scratch, sending you to the hospital. Instead, observe wildlife from a distance so they are not scared or forced to flee.

Read More…